Giving Students Control

14 Mar

Over the past week, I have read numerous emails, blogs, and tweets about personalized learning, many with links to student samples or courses that teachers are redesigning so that students can have more control over their learning. Each time I navigated to these sites and saw what others were doing, I was reminded that my own students are achieving some pretty incredible goals in my current Honors Brit Lit course. For the last two and a half years, my students in my Brit Lit (and this year my English II courses) have designed their own curriculum. They choose their own texts, develop their own questions, design activities, manage their time–they control nearly everything in that classroom.

So, to help keep my students focused and organized, I developed an inquiry-based learning plan, inspired by Carol Kuhlthau’s Information Search Process and Grant Wiggins’ UbD template. This site’s purpose is to share with you that plan and many of the resources and strategies that I–and my incredible friends and colleagues Cathy Stutzman, Heather Hersey, and Marci Zane–use to prepare students for rigorous, individualized, responsible learning. The plan is to have students, teachers, librarians, administrators,  and parents contribute to this site to share with you the struggles and achievements of this type of learning.

The learning plan, which is posted to this site, is yours to use and modify for your courses. We just ask that if you implement this plan, you adhere to the license and share your successes and challenges with us!

2 Responses to “Giving Students Control”

  1. edtosavetheworld March 14, 2013 at 9:59 pm #

    Meg, this sounds amazing! We often talk about students setting their own goals, but this takes it to the next level! Kudos for taking such a valuable risk with your students!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Teachers as Learners: Key to the ILP | Letting Go - June 10, 2013

    […] written previously about how the ILP gives students control of their own learning.  Through it, teachers can prepare students to learn on their own: devising […]

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